Reimagining public sector audit information (Slide show)

The story behind the development of the Auditor-General’s Report Information graph, my end-of-career project. 


Many people want to give something back to society at the end of their career. Rich folks may do philanthropic work through foundations and charities. Some take on difficult causes like fighting corruption, eradication of diseases, alleviation of poverty or addressing the other millennium development goals. Others become volunteers in various movements. We should laud these efforts as they address the gaps in the official programs.

View slide deck with full screen

Advertisements

Reimagining public sector audit information

The story behind the development of the Auditor-General’s Report Information graph, my end-of-career project. 
KK Aw (hires)_2

Many people want to give something back to society at the end of their career. Rich folks may do philanthropic work through foundations and charities. Some take on difficult causes like fighting corruption, eradication of diseases, alleviation of poverty or addressing the other millennium development goals. Others become volunteers in various movements. We should laud these efforts as they address the gaps in the official programs.

There are many professionals at the retirement age, who may not be wealthy, but have a wealth of knowledge and expertise accumulated over the years. It would be beneficial if they can put their know-how to good use in addressing societal problems. This was the situation I faced a few years ago and my decision to do an end-of-career project. Continue reading

Facilitating public contributions to the audit process

The Auditor-General, Tan Sri Ambrin Buang, in his speech on Jan 24, 2017, stated that “The risk of fraud is inherent to any organisation. Right now, we are being exposed to seemingly endless cases of fraud and corruption in the public sector.” This is compounded by the incompetence, negligence, omissions, and so on in the public sector. It is more than likely that many cases are covered up by the organizations concerned and the reports published may only be the tip of the iceberg. The auditors may only discover these omissions if they are doing a forensic audit, otherwise, they have to depend on serendipity for their discovery.

However, some citizens may have personal knowledge of the weakness and problematic areas in the government projects or operations of the various public sector entities. These citizens may have worked or interacted with the projects or public sector entities. The knowledge they contribute could be important leads to the auditors for discovering cover-ups. It is important to note that this is not about whistle-blowing or leaking government information but providing leads for the auditors to follow-up.  

Continue reading